• Tatau Fitness - The Journey

    Tatau Fitness - The Journey

    Samoan business owner Clement Nanai runs Tatau Fitness gym in Brisbane, Australia. He shares his journey as a business owner with a vision to serve the community through his gym, living with Autism/ADHD, the process of relocating into their new space and how blessed and grateful they are for the love and support that they continue to receive from their families, friends and the wider community. . Peep the fundraising event in the video below  {{21100}} . Follow them on Facebook here  And on Instagram here 

  • Hp Boyz - Road To Bay Dreams

    Hp Boyz - Road To Bay Dreams

    Follow the HP Boyz as they head to Tauranga and Nelson for Bay Dreams in New Zealand. 

  • Obesity in Paradise

    Obesity in Paradise

    Obesity in Paradise: This episode is about a paradise lost where an obesity crisis is hitting Pacific Islanders. 93 per cent of American Samoan adults are overweight or obese, making it the fattest place on earth. Neighbouring Samoa is not far behind. Sophie Morgan from Unreported World went to the islands to investigate. Warning:  This episode contains some medical procedures.

  • Lolohea Flowers - Sione Lolohea

    Lolohea Flowers - Sione Lolohea

    Sione Lolohea has become a familiar fixture at Kruger Parade, Redbank, just over a half hour drive out of the city of Brisbane. Sione who was born in Tonga and moved to Australia in 1999 from New Zealand, has been selling flowers for nearly 18 years. He has been unable to go back to his factory job after he suffered heart failure but he refuses to stay home and do nothing. You'll find Sione at Kruger Parade, Redbank from 6am to 6pm Wednesday to Sunday. Parker Films shares his story with us here. {{20980}}

  • Joeli Vidiri, the greatest All Black that never was | Scratched: Aotearoa's Lost Sporting Legends

    Joeli Vidiri, the greatest All Black that never was | Scratched: Aotearoa's Lost Sporting Legends

    In 1996, Joeli Vidiri was set to be the star of New Zealand rugby alongside his good friend Jonah Lomu. But deteriorating kidneys led to his early retirement from the sport, aged just 27. Today, Joeli works at a hardware store in Auckland and is grateful everyday for the kidney transplant he received in 2015.

  • Valle - The Outliers

    Valle - The Outliers

    Valle is a PNG born, Christchurch based artist who travels back to his birth country to learn about who he is.  Meeting his grandmother and family proves to be one of the most pivotal moments in Valle’s life.  His latest single "Prodigy" which features John Givez & Sam V was recently featured on the Ebro Show on Monday, on Apple Music 1. Listen to it here  Valle cover photo: Fire Fire / The Outliers

  • NIKOLAI TALAMAHINA X HERE WE ARE

    NIKOLAI TALAMAHINA X HERE WE ARE

    "I think in a Pasifika context, there's a lot of shame - there's definitely a lot of shame around being trans masculine." Nikolai Talamahina, aka Brown Boy Magik, is still working out what masculinity means to him. In this video, by Claire-Eastham-Farrelly, the musician, curator, events facilitator and "big energy Aries" talks about what it's like when you're suddenly expected to be "one of the boys".

  • An Island in the Pandemic

    An Island in the Pandemic

    A story about community resilience in the face of Covid-19 impacts on an isolated community in the Pacific. In the face of unprecedented challenges, the small Hawaiian Island of Molokai responds with human kindness, collaborative solutions, and a shift towards sustainable local food systems.

  • Dear Thalia (Hawaii Homeless Documentary)

    Dear Thalia (Hawaii Homeless Documentary)

    Dear Thalia follows The Martin Family (Tracy, Tabatha, & Thalia) being homeless living in Kakaako, Oahu/Hawai’i. Filmed over a course of 4 months on weekends (8-10 hours a day), some weekdays/holidays and the Family having a GoPro for the entire duration 24/7. Living in paradise with the cost of living and cost of a home, its very common to have people working multiple jobs or still living with their parents. Add in a loss of a job, or a medical situation/emergency, or any other variable that could potentially have you sleeping on friends couches or on the streets. See what its like to live on a sidewalk in Kakaako, Oahu Hawaii.

  • THE FAREWELL - Tōfā si ou Tinā

    THE FAREWELL - Tōfā si ou Tinā

    In 2018, Raymond Sagapolutele travelled to Frankfurt, Germany to take part in the exhibition 'Grey is the new Pink', a work that featured his mother Ruta and sister Ufitia. In 2019, Raymond returned to Frankfurt, this time together with Ufitia and her dance sisters Natalia and Lycia. "I had discussed the possibility of including a choreographed contemporary Siva Samoa with the team at Weltkulturen, explaining that it would be a chance for our family to pay respect to our mother and to also provide an opportunity for a group of Samoans to be present and reconnect with the archive as I had done the previous year. From a narrative point of view, it was also a chance to complete the circle for our mother and sister who, seven years prior, had danced as representatives of two distinct styles. Ufitia had evolved in her practice as a dancer and would be able to honour what our mother had taught her and show her fa’aaloalo (deference and respect) to dance one more time on behalf of aiga as we say goodbye" - Raymond Sagapolutele  Check out the full project here

  • BEING: Makua Rothman

    BEING: Makua Rothman

    Named the first World Surf League Big Wave Champion, native Hawaiian Makua Rothman has chased and charged the most massive waves in the world. This documentary gives you an in-depth look into his unlikely rise to a Hawaiian hero.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - CHURCH & AP "READY OR NOT"

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - CHURCH & AP "READY OR NOT"

    This episode tracks Church & AP’s speedy rise in the hip hop world and explores where the new New Zealand hip hop sound is heading. Because, ready or not, the future of Aotearoa hip hop is already here. Before Church & AP's 2019 hit 'Ready or Not' was even released, it had been picked up by Mai FM, played at Childish Gambino’s Pharos festival, and been the most Shazam-ed song in New Zealand. 'Ready or Not' was set to become a phenomenon. {{19391}} And its success wasn’t limited to Aotearoa either – this homegrown hit made it big internationally too. Radio BBC 1Xtra discovered the song, and soon the boys were on a flight to the UK. Ready or Not, with its falsetto hook, banger chorus, and fresh vocals, was being played on repeat. Speaking about Church & AP’s international acclaim, hip hop artist Dirty says, “because of the internet, people aren’t just looking left and right and trying to be the best rapper on their street, you know. It’s like you’re actually competing with the world.” Church & AP’s rise to the top didn’t come out of nowhere. The duo found a mentor in kiwi rapper Melodownz at a music program in their local community centre. He was one of the people who pushed the pair to continue with their music. Straight from school, still in their uniform, Church flicked AP the hook for what would become Ready or Not. “These kids are like, so driven in what they know they ant to do and how they want to do it,” says DJ ILL BAZ. “It’s just their first, like, they’re not even getting started yet.” {{19392}} The song, perhaps, crests a new wave in New Zealand hip hop which has been rising for some time: artists who take the history of Aotearoa hip hop, of international hip hop and build on it. As Scribe says “I wanna hear what else they got. I wanna hear stories. I wanna feel it… I’m looking forward to what they’ll do. I’m looking forward to what the next generation does because I think it’ll be big.” . About Church & AP {{19394}} Church (Elijah Manu) and AP (Albert Purcell) are a rap duo who met at school in Auckland. Their music has plenty of other local artists featured, many who are mentors for the duo. Much of their learning has been credited to a community outreach programme where they learnt how to use software and record music as well as assisting in meeting plenty of their mentors. In 2019 they released their debut album ‘Teeth’. NZ Hip Hop Stand Up was made possible by the RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund.

  • FEVER SPIKE

    FEVER SPIKE

    It’s been wiped out from nearly every other country in the western world but in New Zealand we just can’t seem to eradicate it. Rheumatic fever is firmly entrenched here and rates are on the rise. We’re with 26-year old rugby player, Matt Johnson who’s lucky to be alive, and speak to the doctors who call this disease and it’s ongoing spike in cases, “distressing” and “disgraceful”.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SHEELAROC 'IF I GAVE YOU TH MIC'

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SHEELAROC 'IF I GAVE YOU TH MIC'

    When New Zealand’s first all-female hip hop crew, Sheelahroc, dropped their track ‘If I Gave U Th’ Mic’ in 2000, they were propelled onto the national stage. The crew consisted of three members: Ladi6, Voodoo Child, and Tyra Hammond. They were rappers, writers, performers, singers, and MCs. In short, they were, as hip hop artist Randa describes them, “dope, talented woman.” {{19251}} Voodoo Child thinks back to the birth of Sheelahroc: “everyone else that was MCing the time that I was around were all male. But I heard from somebody else that there was another chick in Christchurch who was also writing raps.” That chick was Ladi6. They joined forces, and soon after Sheelahroc picked up their third member, Ladi’s cousin, Tyra. The teenagers treated their band like a business, holding weekly meetings and even keeping minutes. The vision was clear. Ladi saw all-female rap crews overseas and wanted that same representation here in New Zealand. “There are definitely attitudes out there that women should be a certain way,” Randa says, “like, gentle or low key. But when you see a woman with mad skills, you cannot deny the power there.” {{19253}} When their single was released, New Zealand’s hip hop industry was sorely lacking in female representation. Radio stations across the country quickly discovered Sheelahroc’s talent and If I gave u th’ mic was nominated for a bNet music award. Rapper and hip hop artist Scribe grew up in the same Christchurch neighbourhood as Sheelahroc. He saw a challenge in the all-female rap crews’ path to success. “[Sheelahroc] made me kinda be like, oh, hang on, I’m going to get left behind here if I don’t get my shit together,” Scribe says. This episode follows Sheelahroc from their origins through to their breakup. It explores female empowerment, the early 2000s hip hop industry, and unearths the terrible music video all the members thought (and hoped) was long lost. . About the artists Sheelahroc {{19255}} The meaning of Sheelahroc is ‘Women are the Strength’ which signifies all that this group embody. The group formed in Christchurch in 1999 and consisted of females of various ethnicities with the aim to provide a supportive environment for females in what is a classically a male dominant Hip Hop scene. Original band members were Karoline Tamati (Ladi6), Sarah Tamaira (Voodoo Child) & Tyra Hammond. In 2001, Sheelahroc released ‘If I Gave U Th’ Mic’ and won the award for the Most Promising New Act at the bNet Music Awards. Ladi6 was a consultant for this documentary series. . Ladi6 {{19257}} Ladi6 (Karoline Tamati) was born in Christchurch although she recalls her initial song writing memories began when she and her family spent a year in Africa when she was a teenager. Ladi and her cousin Tyra Hammond and Sarah Tamaira started the band when she was just 16 years old. Once the band went their separate ways, Ladi met Brent Parks, a talented musician who she started the group ‘Verse Two’ with and who eventually she married. Verse Two shared band members with Shapeshifter and they encouraged her to move to Melbourne where she collaborated with Shapeshifter on ‘When I Return’. Ladi has released three albums (‘The Liberation Of…’ was certified platinum in 2011), won a number of significant awards and collaborated with other high profile artists such as her cousin Scribe and Fat Freddy’s Drop. . Tyra Hammond {{19259}} Tyra Hammond grew up in Christchurch with her cousin Karoline Tamati (Ladi6) and formed the band Sheelahroc together. Once the band split, Tyra continued to make music after meeting Jeremy Toy, one of Opensouls core band members. Influenced strongly by funk, Tyra bought a fresh sound and the band created a side group named ‘Tyra and the Tornadoes’. The Opensouls continued to make music with Toy & Tyra doing the majority of the songwriting to compliment Tyra’s vocals. The band released two albums, Kaleidoscope and Standing in the Rain. . Sarah Tamaira {{19261}} Sarah Tamaira also known as Voodoo Child was a member of Sheelahroc, an all-female band that started in Christchurch with a focus on including and encouraging the female Hip Hop artists to have a voice in what was usually a scene dominated by males. Their single ‘If I Gave You The Mic’ won the award for Most Promising New Act at the 2001 bNet Music Awards. NZ Hip Hop Stand Up was made possible by the RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - KING KAPISI "REVERSE RESISTANCE"

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - KING KAPISI "REVERSE RESISTANCE"

    Kiwi-Samoan artist King Kapisi’s 1999 hit 'Reverse Resistance' raised the standard for music. It sent shock waves through Aotearoa’s underground hip hop scene and with it, Kapisi became the first-ever hip hop artist to win the coveted Silver Scroll songwriting award. This episode explores how King Kapisi uses his music discuss the effects of colonisation, show Samoan pride and share the stories that matter to him. As Scribe says, “that’s why he’s the king.” In the words of Auckland hip hop duo Eno x Dirty, “he exudes hip hop and Pasifika as well.” Kapisi grew up in Wellington but maintained a strong connection with his ancestral home of Samoa. He found inspiration in Samoan hip hop group The Mau, which fused hip hop with Samoan culture. For Kapisi, The Mau expanded the realm of what was possible in music. {{19191}} “I have a very strong cultural roots connection to my home of Samoa,” Kapisi reflects. “The difference between most rappers and me was that I was going to represent me and my hood, my country, and the area that I’m from. And so I make South-Pacific hip hop.” This South-Pacific focus shines through. In his lyrics, rapped over stripped-back guitars, drums, and even an orchestral string section, he speaks of combating colonialism. He focuses on the religion it brought into Samoa and the lives it “fucked up”. The song stands in resistance to colonial power calling for its reversal. Even Reverse Resistance’s music video, filmed on Savai’i, in his village of Fagamalo, works to this end. Directed by Kapisi’s sister, Sima Urale, it shows Samoa not as a commercialised holiday destination or a page out of National Geographic, but as a living place in its own right. It moves hip hop from the hood to the Islands. NZ hip hop artist Melodownz recalls watching the video with his Samoan grandmother: “I’d never been to Samoa, so she was telling me about where things were and stuff in that video... It made her happy.” {{19189}} Reverse Resistance is a dope, high-quality, well-composed song, but more than that – it is music as a tool and as a weapon. King Kapisi’s uncompromising style emanates Samoan pride. He smiles, “I’m very, very lucky that my whole career I’ve made music that I like and I actually dig, and I can live with it because I don’t have to change for anyone. Just me.” . About King Kapisi {{19193}} Bill Urale began his musical days rapping under the name Bran Muffin in his hometown Wellington. Several years later, he and Submariner (Andy Morton) were introduced and Bill changed his MC name to King Kapisi. Kapisi is the Samoan word for cabbage, a nickname Bill’s mother called him as a child. The two began working together in Submariner’s studio ‘The Hut’ and it was then that he signed with record label Festival Records in 1999. King Kapisi is renowned for his politically conscious lyrics and in 1999 ‘Reverse Resistance’ was released winning the APRA Silver Scroll and being the first Polynesian to do so. King Kapisi has released 3 albums and won numerous other awards and was a consultant for this documentary series. NZ Hip Hop Stand Up was made possible by the RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SCRIBE "STAND UP"

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SCRIBE "STAND UP"

    Parental Guidance recommended for young viewers. Scribe and P-Money tell the story of their record-breaking hit ‘Stand Up’, which knocked international artists off the top of the charts and spent 12 weeks at number one. This episode covers Scribe’s ambitious journey to fame, the shape of Aotearoa’s early 2000s hip hop scene, and the pushback he received from the music industry and features rare behind the scenes footage of the ‘Stand Up’ music video shoot. In 2003, a track off the debut hip hop album by rapper Scribe rocketed to number one on New Zealand’s music charts. The song, ‘Stand Up’, beat out artists including 50 Cent, Justin Timberlake, the Black Eyed Peas and R Kelly. With it, Scribe became the first-ever Kiwi to have a number one single and a number one album – at the same time. {{19137}} DJ P-Money worked with Scribe from the beginning, swapping beats in the form of cassette tapes through the NZ Post. There was a feeling in the air of comradery within New Zealand’s hip hop community, “and Scribe wanted to create the anthem for it,” P-Money says. ‘Stand Up’ was that anthem. In it, Scribe name-dropped a raft of players in the Aotearoa music scene: Nesian Mystik, Footsouljahs, Time Bandits, Deceptikonz, Four Corners, and more. He included not only hip hop artists and breakdancing crews but rock bands as well. {{19139}} “It was important to roll call everyone because, to me, hip hop is everyone,” Scribe says. “It’s about participation. It’s about including people. It’s about acceptance.” Scribe’s success was unprecedented. Almost immediately after ‘Stand Up’s release, he went from writing raps in his cousin’s laundry to getting mobbed by fans at the petrol station. The fame shook him. “It was actually quite scary. Like, I didn’t like it… I’m getting fucking screamed at. People, like, yelling out, surrounding the car, banging on the windows,” he recalls. At the time, no one in New Zealand could compare to that kind of fame. Scribe’s youth, anxiety, and natural introversion did little to help. It was the cost of being the first to the top. Scribe brought Aotearoa hip hop to the forefront of Kiwi consciousness, and swept himself forward with it. {{19140}} NZ Hip Hop Stand Up was made possible by the RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SMASHPROOF "BROTHER"

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SMASHPROOF "BROTHER"

    In this episode, Smashproof grapple with issues of inequality, racism, and grief. The episode tracks the creation of brother, the controversy surrounding the music video, and the resounding impact of the song, both in hip hop and in the wider New Zealand society. When South Auckland trio Smashproof released 'Brother' in 2009, it created controversy. The song’s music video depicted the events leading to the tragic death of Pihema Cameron, who was stabbed for tagging. “It had to be said in a song and it’s unfortunate that some people got offended,” Smashproof member Tyree says. “It definitely stirred some huge topics that we face in society today and that’s, pretty much, racism.” The topic hit home. Brother quickly shot to number one, and now holds the record for the kiwi song which has spent the most consecutive weeks topping Aotearoa’s charts. {{19031}} The hit, with its unusual vocals, catchy beat, and verses depicting life in South Auckland, critiqued systems of crime and poverty in New Zealand. On it, Smashproof spoke about loss, about inequality, about the challenges facing their community. Hip hop artist Tipene explains Bother’s impact: “in terms of the timing, when they came through, that was speaking to the hearts of people, man. And I understand why that song went on to do what it’s done. It broke records, but it also mended hearts.” After the single’s release, the crew felt like “the Beatles of New Zealand” when performing. Smashproof member Sid Diamond was surprised at the popularity of such a personal song. They were a group of three South Auckland teenagers speaking about what South Auckland was like for them and the racism they encountered. But the song stretched beyond this focus. {{19032}} “You know, it happens everywhere, it’s not just South Auckland,” explains Smashproof member Deach. “Even though we use brother as a metaphor for South Auckland, ‘brother’ is just a metaphor for a small community, or for someone that’s struggling, that needs help.” And just as the song speaks to places beyond South Auckland it also reaches beyond the time it was written in. The problems Smashproof highlighted in brother are still relevant to New Zealand today. “It was a really good insight into what was happening at the time, and I guarantee not much has changed.” says Sid Diamond. {{19033}} About the artists Smashproof Smashproof is made up of three artists, Sid Diamond, Tyree Tag & Fred Fa’afou who initially met through the break-dancing circuits of Auckland. Smashproof use their music as a way to express their social commentary and their first album featured the song ‘Brother’ which was a No.1 hit. On the singles chart it held the record for the longest consecutive run at Number 1 by a New Zealand band at eleven weeks, breaking a record previously held for 23 years. {{19035}} In 2009, ‘Brother’ continued on to win a number of awards at the New Zealand Music Awards; Most Singles Sold, Best Music Video and People’s Choice Award. In 2009, the group released their album ‘The Weekend’ and continued on to have three consecutive top twenty singles on the New Zealand singles chart. Each of the artists have released solo albums as well and are all involved with younger generations, whether it’s giving back in their local communities by doing free gigs or being involved in promoting Smoke Free NZ, the group have a very local focus. . Sid Diamond {{19037}} Sid was formally known as ‘Young Sid’ and is renowned as one of New Zealand’s best hip hop artists. He grew up in Otara, South Auckland which was the focus of many of his songs. Sid has released two solo albums, ‘The Truth’ in 2007 and ‘What Doesn’t Kill Me…’ in 2010 which charted for eight weeks and both albums won ‘Urban Album of the Year’ at the Maori Music Awards. . Tyree  {{19039}} Tyree grew up in Papatoetoe, South Auckland and has released two solo albums, his first ‘Now or Never’ before Smashproof’s ‘The Weekend’ and then ‘Motivation’ in 2013. Tyree was disillusioned with the music business for a short period where he moved to Australia to focus on family life, however was encouraged by his record label to continue his music and hence his second album was born. He credits taking the time off in that both he as a person and his voice matured, coming back with more maturity to write and record music.  . Deach {{19041}} Fred Fa’afou known as Deach started his career as a rapper at school in talent quests at school in Mangere and has evolved into an artist known for fusing hip hop, R&B and reggae in his most recent releases.

  • NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SISTERS UNDERGROUND "IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD"

    NZ HIP HOP STAND UP - SISTERS UNDERGROUND "IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD"

    Two teenagers from Ōtara, Brenda and Hassanah, were the voices behind the 1994 song, In the Neighbourhood. Released under the name ‘Sisters Underground’ their song made the NZ Top 10 on release, hit the charts in Australia, and went on to become an iconic part of New Zealand music history. Brenda and Hassanah share their thoughts and memories of In the Neighbourhood. Exploring themes of Pasifika representation, family grief, and what it was like to be two teens rolling in the Ōtara neighbourhood. The song’s success came as something of a surprise to the duo who, years later, are still coming to terms with the resounding impact ‘In the Neighbourhood’ had on Aotearoa. {{18946}} “When that came out, it was a very proud moment,” Upper Hutt Posse member Teremoana Rapley says. “It felt like I wasn’t alone, because up to that point, there were no sisters to the left or to the right of me.”  Sarah Tamaira AKA Voodoo Child shared a similar experience: “You know, when you’re a young girl those kinds of things mean everything to you, seeing brown faces on the TV.” The song carries with it a strong sense of identity. It was funded by a Manukau City Council grant, and the music video was filmed in various locations throughout Ōtara, including their own homes, friends and families. Thinking upon her lyrics, Hassanah explains: “I was really trying to connect the hip hop that I admired to what we would do every day. I wanted it to reflect social inequalities… the true enemy in my mind at that time was, you know, the system.” {{18947}} This mix of hip hop and the everyday might be why the song has meant so much to so many people for so long. When Sisters Underground performed the song to close the 2013 Sliver Scroll Awards, they were shocked at their reception. People were dancing, singing all the lyrics, even crying. A testament, perhaps, to the importance of representation, highlighting as Hassanah says, “what it meant for them to see just regular kids from the kinds of neighbourhoods they came from on TV.” . {{18949}} About the Artists  Brenda and Hassanah went to school and lived in the same neighbourhood of Ōtara and became friends when they were thirteen years old. Read more about Sisters Underground on Audioculture Initially the two performed in halls in South Auckland and then were linked up with producer Alan Jansson who worked with them to record ‘In the Neighbourhood’, which was released in 1994 alongside a music video that focussed on their upbringing in the suburb of Ōtara. The song charted in New Zealand for 12 weeks and went on to become a hit in Australia. It even made the European charts including the Top 10 of the Italian dance chart. In 1995 they were named ‘The Most Promising Group’ at the New Zealand Music Awards. 

  • MARKS OF MANA - FULL DOCUMENTARY

    MARKS OF MANA - FULL DOCUMENTARY

    Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. . *This content is copyright to the CoconetTV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • MARKS OF MANA - THE EVOLUTION OF TATAU Pt5

    MARKS OF MANA - THE EVOLUTION OF TATAU Pt5

    In this final part of this award winning documentary we look at some of our most tapu forms of tatau and their meanings, and how these ancient marks have travelled across the Moana and still connect us today. Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. .  Part One tells one family's story of the intergenerational malu, as told by the daughters of high chief Va'asilitfiti Moelagi Jackson who sadly passed away after this documentary was filmed.  Part Two explores the history and stories of the moko kauae ta moko in Aotearoa and the female tatau lineage of this art Part Three looks at the tep tok tradition in Papua New Guinea and how women were the creators of these marks made to honour the female line.   Part Four of Marks of Mana looks at the original legend of Tatau in Samoa intended for women, and the first female Tufuga tatau who has been gifted to tools of the au again. Marks of Mana Part 5 looks at the ways that Tatau stories connect all our Moana cultures and the different forms of these ancient patterns and meanings. .  *This content is copyright to the CoconetTV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • MARKS OF MANA - CONTEMPORARY SAMOAN TATAU STORIES PT4

    MARKS OF MANA - CONTEMPORARY SAMOAN TATAU STORIES PT4

    Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. .  Part One tells one family's story of the intergenerational malu, as told by the daughters of high chief Va'asilitfiti Moelagi Jackson who sadly passed away after this documentary was filmed.  Part Two explores the history and stories of the moko kauae ta moko in Aotearoa and the female tatau lineage of this art Part Three looks at the tep tok tradition in Papua New Guinea and how women were the creators of these marks made to honour the female line.   Part Four of Marks of Mana looks at the original legend of Tatau in Samoa intended for women, and the first female Tufuga tatau who has been gifted to tools of the au again. .  *This content is copyright to the CoconetTV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • MARKS OF MANA - PAPUA NEW GUINEA TEP TOK Pt3

    MARKS OF MANA - PAPUA NEW GUINEA TEP TOK Pt3

    Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. . Part One tells one family's story of the intergenerational malu, as told by the daughters of high chief Va'asilitfiti Moelagi Jackson who sadly passed away after this documentary was filmed.  Part Two explores the history and stories of the moko kauae ta moko in Aotearoa and the female tatau lineage of this art Part Three looks at the tep tok tradition in Papua New Guinea and how women were the creators of these marks made to honour the female line.   Part Four of Marks of Mana looks at the original legend of Tatau in Samoa intended for women, and the first female Tufuga tatau who has been gifted to tools of the au again. Marks of Mana Part 5 looks at the ways that Tatau stories connect all our Moana cultures and the different forms of these ancient patterns and meanings. . *This content is copyright to the Coconet TV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • MARKS OF MANA - MOKO KAUAE STORIES Pt2

    MARKS OF MANA - MOKO KAUAE STORIES Pt2

    Part 2 of the award winning documentary ‘Marks of Mana’ looks at the stories of Moko Kauae in the Maori communities and the history of this age old taonga. ‘Marks of Mana’ is a feature documentary film that looks at the histories and stories of female Tatau across the Moana. From female tufuga and ta moko artists, to those who wear these ancient patterns, we find out why these marks had so much meaning and why it’s important to keep them alive. . Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. . Part One tells one family's story of the intergenerational malu, as told by the daughters of high chief Va'asilitfiti Moelagi Jackson who sadly passed away after this documentary was filmed.  Part Two explores the history and stories of the moko kauae ta moko in Aotearoa and the female tatau lineage of this art Part Three looks at the tep tok tradition in Papua New Guinea and how women were the creators of these marks made to honour the female line.   . *This content is copyright to the Coconet TV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • JERI - Episode 3

    JERI - Episode 3

    Follow Women’s competitor and 1st place winner, Jeri Galeai, as she prepares and competes in the 2019 World Fireknife Competition. In this episode Jeri's father David shares the fire knife dance heritage that comes down from his Mother and Aunty who was the first female Fire Knife Dancer.  We follow Jeri into the final against fellow finalists Moemoana Schwenke & Huang Shi Ping 

  • JERI - Episode 2

    JERI - Episode 2

    Follow Women’s competitor and 1st place winner, Jeri Galeai, as she prepares and competes in the 2019 World Fireknife Competition. In this episode she shares her practise techniques and we follow her through the preliminary round of the World Fireknife Competition where they're brought the Womens competition back and have 7 competitors vying for the top spot.

  • JERI - Episode 1

    JERI - Episode 1

    Follow Women’s competitor and 1st place winner, Jeri Galea'i, as she prepares and competes in the 2019 World Fireknife Competition.

  • MARKS OF MANA - MALU STORY Pt1

    MARKS OF MANA - MALU STORY Pt1

    Across the Moana the art of tatau is legendary - but the marks for women contain stories and meanings that are often little known, especially for new generations.  These age old symbols of the Moko Kauae, the Fijian Veiqia, the Papuan Tep Tok and the Samoan Malu were made to celebrate the significance of the female role, but many were also created by female tatau artists.  'Marks of Mana' explores the female history of tatau in our cultures, and the meaning behind these patterns linked like a necklace around the Moana. . Part One tells one family's story of the intergenerational malu, as told by the daughters of high chief Va'asilitfiti Moelagi Jackson who sadly passed away after this documentary was filmed.  Part Two explores the history and stories of the moko kauae ta moko in Aotearoa and the female tatau lineage of this art Part Three looks at the tep tok tradition in Papua New Guinea and how women were the creators of these marks made to honour the female line.   . *This content is copyright to the Coconet TV so please share it freely through our share button and refrain from illegally downloading and re-uploading fa’amolemole.

  • THE ROGERS OF SAMOA

    THE ROGERS OF SAMOA

    An intimate glimpse of the first visible group of transgender men in the Pacific Islands - the Rogers of Samoa. From the loneliness of family rejection and homelessness to the camaraderie of church, cooking, and dance, their stories reveal the challenges and possibilities of life in an island society rooted in culture and tradition. Dedicated in loving memory to To'oto'oali'i (Roger) Stanley (1976-2018) 

  • 80's ICONS 'THE JETS'

    80's ICONS 'THE JETS'

    Flashback Tonight goes on location to catch up with the hit making siblings from the 80's THE JETS. They let it all hang out regarding the family split, not being able to read music & songs they hate & miss singing. Also if you were around in the 90s you may remember RnB group 'All 4 One' - the Flashback Tonight interviewer is part of that group! 

  • A Dress and a Cardigan for Mele - Conversations With My Immigrant Parents

    A Dress and a Cardigan for Mele - Conversations With My Immigrant Parents

    From Converstaions with my Immigrant Parents   Produced for RNZ by Saraid de Silva and Julie Zhu | Made possible by the RNZ/NZ On Air Innovation Fund When Liliani Waigth migrated to Aotearoa from Tonga as a 21 year old in the 1970s, she had no idea it would be another 15 years before she went back. “I hop out of the plane and it was freezing cold.  Coming from a country that’s so warm, coming over to New Zealand, it was foggy and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, what am I doing over in this country over here.’ Staying initially in Auckland where she had family, Liliani soon met her Pālagi husband and moved to the East Coast.  She was one of the first Tongan migrants to settle in Gisborne where there were only a handful of other Tongan families that she knew of at the time. Liliani had two daughters and two sons, however her first daughter passed away as a baby.  Her daughter Kesaia now lives in Wellington and works as a principal research analyst of the Waitangi Tribunal for the Ministry of Justice.  In her 60s now and retired, Liliani talks with Kesaia on the phone every day and has done so for the last 17 years. {{15950}} Kesaia’s dad passed away when she was 13 and Liliani raised her three kids largely as a single mother.  Despite this, she had strong reservations when Kesaia fell pregnant with her first child while unmarried.  Through this conversation, mother and daughter discuss how different expectations in the countries they were raised in have influenced their approaches to marriage and motherhood. “My mother, she always talked to me about those kinds of things, you know?  If I go with a boy or have a boyfriend, and you go and have… you know, have a baby or something like that.  That is really–,” starts Liliani. Kesaia finishes her sentence, “Really bad.  I don’t think anybody here really cares that much.  For me - because I left home at 17, there was no culture, there was no community to really disappoint.  So I didn’t sort of worry about that.” This episode covers expectations of Tongan women, grief, and how different generations perceive the notion of sacrifice, all with Kesaia’s five month old Raita gurgling in the background. Click here to listen to the full conversation between Liliani and her daughter Kesaia 

  • NADOLO - The Documentary

    NADOLO - The Documentary

    "Nadolo" explores the life and career of Fijian rugby legend Nemani Nadolo. He’s one of the most feared wingers on the planet. A six foot four, 137kg colossus that has run roughshod over countless defenders on four continents. Yet there is another side to Nemani Nadolo. RugbyPass goes behind the scenes with Nadolo at his home in Montpellier, to meet the man behind the fearsome reputation. We find a husband, a brother and a friend whose off-field persona is radically at odds with the fearsome Fijian giant that prowls the Top 14. From his early days in Queensland to a career that has literally taken him across the globe, and which has seen him go from a potential nearly ran that considered leaving the professional game to becoming one of the sport’s most celebrated sons. We hear from his brother Chris, his wife Kim, his teammates as well as the big man himself, about the man behind the tries. This is ‘Nadolo’ – The Documentary.

  • LIKE A MIGHTY WAVE: A MAUNAKEA FILM

    LIKE A MIGHTY WAVE: A MAUNAKEA FILM

    This short film, Like A Mighty Wave, was created by Mikey Inouye​, local boy and filmmaker who is a part of the immense talent that makes up our Mauna media team. The film captures the transformative impact that the sacrifice of our kūpuna on July 17th has had in Hawaiʻi - an impact that reverberates throughout the globe. Mahalo nui loa Mikey Inouye and the many members of the Mauna media team who helped capture this pivotal moment in history. The film was spotlighted at the Hawaiʻi International Film Festival in November. Mikey is now making it available to the public as a fundraiser for HULI to help ensure that this movement remains strong at every level. The film is free and accessible to all but we ask that as you take in the emotion and beauty of the movement captured in this film, that you also make a donation through HULIʻs action network page here - https://actionnetwork.org/fundraising/huli Aloha ʻāina and Kū Kiaʻi Mauna!

  • How the US Territory of Guam became an American Colony

    How the US Territory of Guam became an American Colony

    The U.S. territory of Guam has a unique history as one of the longest-running colonies in history. How did it get this way? Guam has been colonized by the Spanish, occupied by the Japanese and militarized by the Americans. But the history of its indigenous Chamorro people goes back even further.  AJ+ went to Guam to speak with indigenous Chamorro people about the island's complicated past. Watch the rest of the documentary series below: -  Part 2  More Americans from Guam serve in the U.S. military, per capita, than from any U.S. state. But they can’t even vote for president. AJ+ Producer Jun Stinson goes to Guam to speak with service members and veterans about what it's like to serve a country that doesn't allow you to vote. Then she meets up with indigenous Chamorro activists who are fed up and consider Guam to be a U.S. colony. {{15258}} . Part 3  There’s a growing movement of young people on Guam who envision a sustainable future for the island. They want to end the island's dependency on imported processed foods, which has been ongoing since World War II and has led to high rates of heart disease and diabetes. {{15259}} .  Part 4  What does it mean to be a citizen of a United States territory and also be indigenous? The Chamorro people on Guam tell us about their multifaceted — and often complicated — identity. {{15260}}

  • Otara - Defying the Odds

    Otara - Defying the Odds

    Postwar Māori, Pākehā and Pacific Island migrants made Ōtara the fastest growing area in New Zealand. But as local industries closed, it became a poster suburb for poverty and crime. This TV3 Inside New Zealand documentary sees eight successes from Ōtara telling their stories — from actor Rawiri Paretene and MP Tau Henare, to teachers and entrepreneurs. They reflect on mean streets, education, community and the Ōtara spirit. 

  • Under the Bridge | A Year Inside Papakura High School

    Under the Bridge | A Year Inside Papakura High School

    At the edge of the city and the margins of society, a school and its students are fighting back. Under The Bridge is the story of a year inside their world. Papakura East is one of the poorest suburbs in the country, with Auckland’s highest rate of welfare dependency, and where the average household income hovers just above $46,000. It also has a reputation for drugs and crime and the police are never far away.  “It feels surreal. I didn’t think I was going to make it - in my family we weren’t expected to go as far in school, and that goes to say for a lot of families in Papakura as well. You’re expected to mature faster so all you’re taught is being a mum or going to get a job. It isn’t an expectation of us to go all the way.” - Wendy Savieti, Head Girl, Papakura High School  Read the full story here: http://features.nzherald.co.nz/under-the-bridge/

  • WAISALE SEREVI: THE FIJIAN MAGICIAN

    WAISALE SEREVI: THE FIJIAN MAGICIAN

    The Fijian magician is widely considered one of, if not the greatest rugby sevens players of all time. Serevi was known as ‘The King of Sevens’ for his stunning contribution to the shortened format of the game as a player and coach. Able to turn a game on its head in the blink of an eye with a swivel of his hips, an untouchable side-step or a wonderfully weighted pass, Serevi was the heartbeat of the Fijian team, scoring 1,310 points on the World Rugby Sevens Series and a record 297 points in Rugby World Cup Sevens tournaments. A five-time Cup winner at the prestigious Hong Kong Sevens, Serevi steered Fiji to their first world series title in his first year as player-coach in 2005-06. They were also bronze medallists at the 2006 Commonwealth Games. Serevi also played 38 tests for Fiji in 15s, gracing three Rugby World Cups, scoring 221 points in a stop-start career that ran from 1989-2003.

  • ONEFOUR: Australia’s First Drill Rappers

    ONEFOUR: Australia’s First Drill Rappers

    Onefour are Australia’s first drill rappers, a style born out of Chicago (Chief Keef, Lil Durk, King Louie & Chiraq Drill rappers) and the UK (Harlam Spartans, Loski, RV and more).  OneFour began tailoring their craft at Street University; a youth development project created by the Ted Noffs foundation in Mt Druitt. “It was where our rap careers started. We learnt to mix tracks and that,” Spenny14 smiles affectionately. “Shoutout to Julie. She’s a good lady. She used to look after us.” It was at Street University that OneFour came together as Australia’s first drill group. Their music is getting attention from all over the world. VICE meets Onefour in Western Sydney, to explore the neighbourhoods that they grew up in and visit the set of their music video ‘Spot The Difference’.

  • FOR MY FATHERS KINGDOM TRAILER

    FOR MY FATHERS KINGDOM TRAILER

    For My Father's Kingdom follows Tongan pensioner Saia Mafile’o and his family as they are stretched to breaking point by the commitment and passion to God that has driven Saia’s life. This debut feature documentary offers a rich view of how contemporary secular families deal with the rigours of devout Christian tithing, as well as a unique insight into traditional Tongan culture. The film will had its New Zealand premiere at the New Zealand International Film Festival. It is now showing to the public in the following theatres:  AUCKLAND  Bridgeway Cinema, Auckland Capitol Cinema, Balmoral Event Cinemas, Manukau Event Cinemas, Westcity Monterey, Howick Reading, New Lynn Rialto Cinemas, OUTSIDE AUCKLAND Rialto Cinemas, Dunedin & Russell Cinema Dome, Gisborne

  • ANGIE SCARTH-JOHNSON in PACIFIC LINES

    ANGIE SCARTH-JOHNSON in PACIFIC LINES

    In the trailer to her debut film, 14 year old Angie Scarth-Johnson travels to ‘Eua – an island in the Kingdom of Tonga, with two objectives: to connect to a side of her family she previously knew little about, and to evolve her climbing career from climbing hard grades, to developing new routes. Angie sets out to explore her past, and the possibilities of route development in Tonga alongside bolting-mentor and team mate Lee Cossey. The film has had a limited screening in Australia and is set to have its preview screening here at the New Zealand Mountain Festival Opening Night on the 28th of June where it has won the Special Jury Award. {{13260}} Angie who has just turned 15 has both Tongan and Spanish heritage and now has her sights set on qualifying for the Olympics.  She shares her 'Story of Ambition' in the video above. JLL Properties  are helping six young climbers (including Angie) to make it onto the world stage. They're providing them with world-class training facilities, a superstar coach and cutting-edge technology to help them analyse their movements like never before - check out the 6 young climbers in the vid below. {{13261}}

  • UNSUNG - THE JETS

    UNSUNG - THE JETS

    Rising to success in the mid-80s, the hit teenage group The Jets put a surprising twist on the Minneapolis sound and drew inspiration from Prince. Comprised of five brothers and three sisters of Tongan descent, the group took the R&B and Pop charts by storm with hits like “Crush on You,” “You Got it All,” and “Make it Real.” With so much of their success based on their youth appeal, the band fizzled from the spotlight by their early 20s. The group’s lead singer left the group after she was diagnosed with breast cancer at 21, and the other siblings gradually drifted apart. Twenty-five years later, the family members are still making music, but have split into two bands due to personal differences. Despite the split, the members are still entertaining audiences with music that initially captured their fans hearts. Watch their journey in the Unsung music documentary above. About Unsung UNSUNG celebrates the lives of trailblazing musicians whose full stories and journey have yet to be explored. This season promises memorable stories of influential artists including singer/songwriter Shirley Murdock, dance music legend Crystal Waters, R&B crooner Glenn Jones, vocalist Kenny Lattimore and contemporary gospel musician Tasha Cobbs Leonard.