• IT TAKES A VILLAGE

    IT TAKES A VILLAGE

    Hawaiʻi's high cost of living and unaffordable housing market is putting more and more pressure on local families. How many more people and generations can we squeeze into our homes just to be able to afford to live here? How many more of our family members have to move away before we say enough is enough? The long-term solution is that we need to push for better policies to create enough TRULY affordable housing (below 100% AMI). Unfortunately we have a homeless crisis to deal with right now and new housing programs for the homeless, like Housing First, are working well but are very limited in scale. We, as a society, are unable to provide solutions to this housing and homeless crisis right now so what do we do for our most vulnerable people who are living unsheltered every day that this problem continues?

  • 1918: SAMOA & THE TALUNE - SHIP OF DEATH

    1918: SAMOA & THE TALUNE - SHIP OF DEATH

    The relationship between New Zealand and Samoa is very complex. The pages of our histories are intertwined and blotted with black marks right next to NZ's name. On the 7th November 1918, the NZ military administration controlling Samoa, led by Col. Robert Logan, made the deadly decision to knowingly allow a ship called 'The Talune" carrying Spanish Influenza to dock in Apia Harbour.  The results were catastrophic, wiping out over a quarter of Samoas population and decimating entire families and villages in what is one of the worst cultural catastrophes in history.

  • BORN OF CONFLICT - Children of the Pacific War

    BORN OF CONFLICT - Children of the Pacific War

    Between 1942 and 1945, more than 2 million Americans went to war in the South Pacific. When World War II ended they went home leaving 100,000 dead, tons of military equipment and over 2,000 children.   This doco looks at the stories of three children left behind by American servicemen posted to the Pacific during WWII. Now in their early 70s, these children were identified through an Otago University research programme.

  • Samoa - Diabetes Epidemic

    Samoa - Diabetes Epidemic

    Type 2 Diabetes is now the leading cause of death in Samoa. It threatens to overwhelm the health system and bankrupt the country. What is Samoa doing to turn this around? Like many countries around the world, as Samoa takes on a Western lifestyle they take on Western problems. Type 2 diabetes has gone from non-existent to their biggest killer in a generation.

  • Struggling for a better Living, Squatters in Fiji

    Struggling for a better Living, Squatters in Fiji

    The Pacific Way team travel around the Country looking at squatters and poverty in Fiji. This story seeks to demystify the reason why there are so many squatters in Fiji today and analyses government efforts to reduce their numbers.

  • Chinese businesses in Samoa

    Chinese businesses in Samoa

    This documentary meets the descendants of the people that changed the face of Samoa and takes a look at the potential problems that come with the new wave of Chinese arriving in Samoa today. Despite the history, the newest wave of Chinese to arrive in Samoa has upset a lot of the locals. Taking businesses that should be set aside for Locals, skirting laws set up to prevent them from doing so and funnelling money out of the Samoan economy, are just some of the issues being voiced by Samoans.

  • History of The Chinese in Samoa

    History of The Chinese in Samoa

    The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Samoa in the late 19th Century. As time stretched on and the more that came (be it as free settlers or indentured labourers), they integrated into the culture, learnt the fa'asamoa, married Samoans, had Samoan families and eventually died in Samoa as Samoans. The legacy they left behind is powerful and can be seen in the culture and the people of Samoa today.

  • SAMOANA - Documentary

    SAMOANA - Documentary

    The hour-long documentary covers 3000 years of Samoa’s history. Major events highlighted in the film include the partition of Western Samoa in the nineteenth century, rule by Imperial Germany, New Zealand trusteeship and the road toward independence. Scenes in Samoana include dramatic representation of the killing of unarmed Mau supporters by New Zealand troops in 1929 , and the massive death toll of the influenza epidemic which followed the First World War. The film also illustrates key aspects of “Fa`a Samoa” - tattooing, ava (kava) ceremonies and the chiefly system.

  • Teaching the Taualuga with Filoi Vaila'au

    Teaching the Taualuga with Filoi Vaila'au

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "I wanted to start teaching Siva Samoa because I knew that, that was probably something that was lacking here in New Zealand - not everyone grows up around it" - Filoi Vaila'au 

  • Art & Kava in Urban Tonga

    Art & Kava in Urban Tonga

    This short documentary features the Seleka International Art Society Initiative (SIASI). Seleka is a group of mostly urban youth in the Kingdom of Tonga's capital of Nuku'alofa who gather often, as many Tongans do, in order to ingest the land by drinking kava. They have a twist to their gatherings however with the addition of paint and a broad range of global popular music, including the less commonly heard sounds in a kava session of metal, punk, and more. Their adaptations and reflection of their contemporary identities hasn't gone without scrutiny or controversy, but despite those challenges they remain a safe and creative space for young men and women to explore and confront the taboo's of their society and culture. This footage was being saved to be part of a larger kava documentary project based in my doctoral studies, which is still another year or so away from being completed. Due to the recent devastation of Cyclone Gita last month, Seleka's fale (Tongan house) was destroyed and they have nowhere to gather. Considering the immediate needs for the group, this footage is being released now in hopes to support overseas fundraising efforts and local support to rebuild a meeting place for the Selekarian's. Mālō 'Aupito to Seleka, supporters, and to 'Inoke Hafoka for crucial feedback in the editing process of this film. Fundraising link:  https://www.youcaring.com/selekasiasitonga-1135454

  • Dancing the Taualuga with Ida & Jill

    Dancing the Taualuga with Ida & Jill

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "Taualuga is the dance of life, siva o le ola, with all your heart, ono mea, gracefulness & loto fiafia - happy heart!"

  • Samoan Queen Salamasina

    Samoan Queen Salamasina

    Descendant from a Nafanua line, Salamasina in the 15th Century was the holder of all four Tafa'ifa titles...

  • Samoan Goddess Nafanua

    Samoan Goddess Nafanua

    One of Samoa's most revered Gods of all was female - Nafanua. Born of a blood clot and buried in the ground, this ancient deity rose from the underworld..

  • Makea Takau Ariki

    Makea Takau Ariki

    Makea Takau Ariki (1839–1911) was a sovereign of the Cook Islands..

  • History of the Taualuga

    History of the Taualuga

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "The taualuga is the final touch to all the fiafia, the taualuga is the same word that they give to the top part of the fale.  You know when it's there that means the whole thing is finished" - Va'asiliifiti Moelagi Jackson 

  • Graduation Leis - Bringing a piece of home to Anchorage

    Graduation Leis - Bringing a piece of home to Anchorage

    Anchorage is home to thriving Polynesian communities, and over the years residents of the city have adopted a favorite island tradition: honoring graduates with handmade leis. Read the full article on Alaska Dispatch here

  • THE NEW OCEANIA

    THE NEW OCEANIA

    Shirley Horrocks' documentary profiles the life, work and influence of pioneering PI writer Albert Wendt (1973's Sons for the Return Home was the first novel published in English by a Samoan). The film accompanies the writer to various locations in the Pacific and addresses his Samoa upbringing, his education in New Zealand and his work as writer and teacher; and discusses the contemporary explosion of Pacific arts. "I belong to Oceania — or, at least, I am rooted in a fertile part of it and it nourishes my spirit, helps to define me, and feeds my imagination." 

  • The Tongan Tau'olunga with Sesilia Pusiaki

    The Tongan Tau'olunga with Sesilia Pusiaki

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "For me it's always an experience ... every time I perform it, it's a different feeling and it's a different moment.  I'm dancing dances that were done by my grandmother and my auntys from back then" - Sesilia Pusiaki 

  • Tau'olunga with Amanaki Prescott Faletau

    Tau'olunga with Amanaki Prescott Faletau

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "Taualuga & Tau'olunga gave me the tools to be graceful and soft & just to learn to be still and be beautiful in stillness" - Amanaki Prescott Faletau 

  • Taualuga with Maryjane

    Taualuga with Maryjane

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "With the taualuga, it's just the best way for me to express myself as a Samoan, it was like when I put my hands up it felt like all the energy from our ancestors, I wasn't just dancing for myself" - Maryjane Mckibbin Schwenke 

  • Christmas Day on Mauke in the Cook Islands

    Christmas Day on Mauke in the Cook Islands

    The people of Mauke have a holiday tradition that is different than any of the other islands in the Cooks. Every Christmas and New Years one of the two villages on the island hosts the other with a feast. The food is laid out at different houses throughout the host village. The guest village then goes from house to house singing traditional songs. Christmas Day starts with a church service and then everyone starts making the rounds singing and feasting. This starts around 1:00 PM and goes on until well after dark. Then, on New Years Day, the villages switch roles and the ones that sang host the other village and they do the singing.

  • BOO YAA T.R.I.B.E Documentary

    BOO YAA T.R.I.B.E Documentary

    A short documentary on the Boo Yaa T.R.I.B.E - Samoan brothers who grew up in Carson, California and are celebrated as the pioneers of Samoan & Poly Hip Hop. They've collaborated with many hip hop & rock artists including Eminem, Mack 10 & The Transplants. Behind the scenes with Boo Yaa T.R.I.B.E on the set of 'Another Body Murdered' with Faith No More and an interview with Ted Devoux aka 'The godfather'. {{8918}} Check out this video of them when they first started out as a dance group the 'Blue City Strutters' where they're featured in the 'Breakin n Enterin, West Coast Hip Hop Doc' 

  • Pacific Island Dance & Hair

    Pacific Island Dance & Hair

    Hair is a vital part of Pacific Island dance and performance. Check out how the various islands deal with all that beautiful hair! To learn about the history of womens hair in the pacific, click here For more hair stories, click here

  • The History of Pacific Hair

    The History of Pacific Hair

    We take you back in time through the Pacific Islands to see the various cultural and traditional hair practices among women. For more on Pacific hair, watch our documentary Adorn For hair stories click here

  • Don't Touch My Hair Stories

    Don't Touch My Hair Stories

    For Island women, we know the struggles and joys that come with our hair. Here are a few stories from our Pasifika sisters on all things HAIR! The third and final segment from Coconet Documentary "Adorn"  ADORN is a collection of stories from women around the Pacific about their relationship with their hair. 

  • Some More Samoa - Tuiga

    Some More Samoa - Tuiga

    This SILENT film clip shows a young Samoan woman having help to assemble and put on a tuiga (ceremonial headdress). In the past tuiga were worn by chiefs during war, overtime these became a status symbol worn during various ceremonies by a chief’s manaia (son) or taupou (daughter). This clip shows how complicated traditional tuiga are, contemporary versions are simplified and assembled in one piece from various urban materials and can be worn by anyone as an expression of Samoan heritage. (Nitrate film deterioration is evident at the end of this clip.) Katharine Hilliker (1885-1965) was the title writer for this silent film. For more information on Katharine Hilliker see Women's Pioneers Film Project https://wfpp.cdrs.columbia.edu/pionee....

  • HOMELESS IN HAWAI'I

    HOMELESS IN HAWAI'I

    Hawai'i has the highest rate of homelesness per capita in the USA exposing an ugly social divide in the Aloha State.

  • DRAGONS IN PARADISE

    DRAGONS IN PARADISE

    The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Samoa in the late 19th Century. As time stretched on and the more that came (be it as free settlers or indentured labourers), they integrated into the culture, learnt the fa'asamoa, married Samoans, had Samoan families and eventually died in Samoa as Samoans. The legacy they left behind is powerful and can be seen in the culture and the people of Samoa today. Despite the history, the newest wave of Chinese to arrive in Samoa has upset a lot of the locals. Taking businesses that should be set aside for Locals, skirting laws set up to prevent them from doing so and funnelling money out of the Samoan economy, are just some of the issues being voiced by Samoans. This documentary delves in to the past, meets the descendants of the people that changed the face of Samoa and takes a look at the potential problems that come with the new wave of Chinese arriving in Samoa today. This is Dragons In Paradise.

  • FA'AFAFINE - Documentary

    FA'AFAFINE - Documentary

    The stories of Samoan fa'afafine from the farms of Savai'i to the stages of the world.

  • COOK ISLANDS TRADITIONAL FOOD FOR SURVIVAL

    COOK ISLANDS TRADITIONAL FOOD FOR SURVIVAL

    Mama Teura Tuakanangaro from the island of Mauke, shares many of the traditional foods & recipes that they would make in the Cook Islands in preparation to survive Cyclone Season. These foods were also prepared by our Pacific Island ancestors when they would go on long ocean voyages.

  • EVERYTHING CAN BE BURNT - West Papua in the Jokowi Era

    EVERYTHING CAN BE BURNT - West Papua in the Jokowi Era

    The face of West Papuan society is changing but RNZ International found that the core ideology of the indigenous people of Indonesia's Papua region is not easily destroyed. Since the making of this documentary, a petition signed by 1.8 million West Papuans seeking an independent vote and self determination was rejected by the United Nations. The United Liberation Movement for West Papua now hopes New Zealand's new Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will take up the issue of their Self Determination with many of her Pacific leaders in the Labour government very supportive of West Papua's human rights.  

  • FIJI INDEPENDENCE

    FIJI INDEPENDENCE

    Fiji became an independent sovereign state on 10th October 1970 when its colonial status was abrogated. Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara, the first Prime Minister of independent Fiji, received from Prince Charles the documents evidencing Fiji’s independence. That independence was and remains a great source of pride and joy to all Fiji citizens. On that day the dark clouds of colonialism were swept away. This 5 part documentary looks at the road to Fiji's independence. . Part 2 {{5666}} Part 3 {{5667}} Part 4 {{5668}} Part 5 {{5669}}

  • MANUMEA

    MANUMEA

    BBC World News recently shared this powerful story about the plight of Samoa's national bird with its global audience of 99 million viewers. The Manumea, a unique tooth-billed pigeon, is only found in Samoa, but there are now estimated to be less than a few hundred left. The Manumea is classified as “Critically Endangered” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the global body that assesses the risk of extinction of species. A Critically Endangered species is one facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and it is the highest risk category assigned by the IUCN Red List for wild species. The Samoa Conservation Society (SCS) has recently teamed up with Auckland Zoo and Samoa's Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MNRE) to try and save the Manumea before it is too late. The Manumea is also known as the "Little Dodo" because it is the closest known relative to the Dodo which famously became extinct almost 400 years ago. Every day Samoans see the Manumea on 20 tala notes and 50 sene coins but soon this could be the only record left of Samoa's beloved national symbol. The “Little Dodo” is threatened by habitat loss, invasive species, especially cats and rats, as well as hunting. Manumea is often accidentally shot as a “by-catch” by hunters targeting Lupe (Pacific pigeon) even though all forms of hunting of native birds and bats is illegal in Samoa. Conservation of the Manumea is complicated by its secretive nature and the fact that its call seems to be mimicked by the Pacific pigeon making positive identification of the bird very tricky. To help conserve the remaining population of Manumea, SCS and MNRE are working together with the Auckland Zoo, local communities where Manumea is found and other partners including the Flinch Marketing company from New Zealand to develop a National Manumea Protection Campaign to reduce the impact of hunting on native birds and to protect their forest habitat. We are also working to establish rainforest conservation areas on both Upolu and Savaii as well as to manage rats at the Malololelei forest reserve on Upolu. Our conservation activities are supported by grants from the UK Darwin Initiative through the Australian National University and from the NZ Government’s Pacific Development and Conservation Trust as well as materials provided for free by Pelgar International. We thank all our partners and donors as well as local communities and landowners for supporting conservation efforts to save Samoa’s Critically Endangered national bird. To view the BBC World and TVNZ stories online and to get more information on how you can help us to conserve the Manumea please visit www.facebook.com/conservesamoa For more information, contact Samoa Conservation Society Vailima E: conservesamoa@gmail.com W: www.samoaconservationsociety.wordpress.com FB: www.facebook.com/conservesamoa

  • WEAVING THE FUTURE

    WEAVING THE FUTURE

    Andy is a young Samoan who left behind his dream of studying art to chase a new passion - tourism

  • ENCORE by Faga Tuigamala

    ENCORE by Faga Tuigamala

    A documentary exploring how young people connect with music in schools. This short doco was submitted in 'The Outlook for Someday 2016' Someday Challenge and won The Coconet.TV Pasifika Award. The Someday Challenge is for anyone up to age 24 to make a sustainability-related film, any genre, any length up to 5 minutes. The Outlook for Someday project is run by Connected Media Charitable Trust at theoutlookforsomeday.net Please show your support at connectedmedia.org/donate for our work to help grow a generation of sustainability storytellers. To enter the challenge this year click on the link below: http://www.theoutlookforsomeday.net/about/film-challenge/  

  • THE SEARCH FOR TAGALOA

    THE SEARCH FOR TAGALOA

    A response to a call for an "intercultural and inter-religious" dialogue by Samoa's Head of State, Tui Atua Tupua Tamasese. From 1838 to 1845, The Rev. John B. Stair lived in Samoa. In his "Old Samoa, or Flotsam and Jetsam from the Pacific Ocean" he wrote of the difficulty of arriving at "anything like a clear and connected account" of Samoan mythology as "native statements are often vague and conflicting." In a chapter titled "Mythology and Spirit-Lore", the Rev. noted: "The Samoans had several divinities and a host of inferior ones, 'lords many and gods many,' and they were also accustomed to deify the spirits of deceased chiefs. In addition to the homage paid to these, petitions were offered and libations of ava (sic) were poured out at the graves of deceased relatives; whilst the war clubs of renowned warriors were regarded with much superstitious reverence, if not actually worshipped, under the name of Anava." He went on to say: "The embalmed bodies of some chiefs were also worshipped under the significant name of Le faa-Atua-lala-ina, or made into a sun-dried god, as were also certain objects into which they were supposed to have been changed, which were called Tupua, and held to personate them." Note: This documentary is available free to Samoan high schools (or churches) in DVD format. Daniel doesn't sell the DVD or monetize the documentary in any way - a labour of Love. Because some of the clips are utilized under Fair Use, the documentary is intended for educational purposes only—not to be sold or resold. Please share but don't sell it in any way or chop it up for another video. Thank you!

  • Worlds first 'documentary' filmed in Samoa

    Worlds first 'documentary' filmed in Samoa

    "Moana" was the world's first film to be described as a 'documentary' and follows the fictional story of the lead male character Moana.  It was filmed in the villages of Safune district on the island of Savai'i in the early 20th Century. In 1924, American filmmaker Robert J. Flaherty moved to Savai'i with the purpose of capturing images of the local Samoans in their habitat, hoping to recreate the success of his previous doco-type film "Nanook of the North,"  Over 50 years later, Monica, his youngest daughter, went back to Samoa and recorded sound for the film and after five years of painstaking work, "Moana with Sound" premiered at the Cinémathèque française in Paris in 1981. When she landed in Savai'i in 1975, she managed to track down three actors who had worked on the film who still lived in the same village.  Today, more than 30 years after that premiere and 90 years after Flaherty first landed on Savai'i, "Moana with Sound" was been restored in 2K by Bruce Posner of the Filmmakers Showcase in Claremont, working with Finnish filmmaker Sami van Ingen. This latest version premiered at the 36th Moscow International Film Festival last year.  The term 'documentary' and this style of filmmaking hadn't been seen before in cinematography, and reviewer John Grierson in 1926 translated the French word 'documentaire' to 'documentary' - effectively making "Moana the first movie to recieve that label. Yet despite this fact, "Moana" in todays film terms wouldn't really be classed as a documentary. Many of the famous scenes were staged, and the family that was depicted in the film were really actors that Flaherty thought had good looks on camera and could act well.  The latest version "Moana with Sound" opens with a quote by Frances Hubbard Flaherty, the director's wife: "Oh, if we could only take back with us the singing. Not the songs, but the singing."  You can check out snippets of the documentary online here and here!

  • Fijian Police Band dancing in the streets

    Fijian Police Band dancing in the streets

    Check out some of the awesome moves by the Fijian Police Marching Band! Bula!! Come to the parade! Here's an experience of the world-renowned Fiji Police Marching Band as they boogie down the main street of Savusavu on the island of Vanua Levu.  For more information: www.fijicharity.org -- This is a companion piece to the films "The Naqaqa Family Farm" https://vimeo.com/143639850 and "Beauty of Fiji Can Make You Cry"https://vimeo.com/140538030 Video by Gary Yost

  • How Polynesians survive in Utah

    How Polynesians survive in Utah

    Got family in the states? Check out this short and sweet clip about 'How Polynesians survive in Utah.' An interesting look into Polynesian people in unfamiliar surroundings and how they have become accustomed to a different cultural lifestyle incorporating their traditional roots. Lured by the Mormon church, many moons ago. Immigrants and descendants from Tonga, Samoa and Hawaii have now grown three times as fast as the rest of the states population over the last decade.

  • I, Too, Am Auckland

    I, Too, Am Auckland

    Check out this awesome video project about what most of our Pasifika university students go through whilst studying.  “I, Too, Am Auckland” is a student-based initiative at The University of Auckland. This video explores experiences and perspective provided by Māori and Pasifika students across a variety of academic disciplines, discussing their experiences with everyday colonialism and racism. This video’s content is based off of research conducted by David Mayeda, Moeata Keil, Hilary Dansey Dutton, and Futa ‘Ofamo’oni: http://www.content.alternative.ac.nz/... Check out the 'I, Too, Am Auckland' page on facebook!