• FOR MY FATHERS KINGDOM TRAILER

    FOR MY FATHERS KINGDOM TRAILER

    For My Father's Kingdom follows Tongan pensioner Saia Mafile’o and his family as they are stretched to breaking point by the commitment and passion to God that has driven Saia’s life. This debut feature documentary offers a rich view of how contemporary secular families deal with the rigours of devout Christian tithing, as well as a unique insight into traditional Tongan culture. The film will have its New Zealand premiere at the New Zealand International Film Festival.

  • ANGIE SCARTH-JOHNSON in PACIFIC LINES

    ANGIE SCARTH-JOHNSON in PACIFIC LINES

    In the trailer to her debut film, 14 year old Angie Scarth-Johnson travels to ‘Eua – an island in the Kingdom of Tonga, with two objectives: to connect to a side of her family she previously knew little about, and to evolve her climbing career from climbing hard grades, to developing new routes. Angie sets out to explore her past, and the possibilities of route development in Tonga alongside bolting-mentor and team mate Lee Cossey. The film has had a limited screening in Australia and is set to have its preview screening here at the New Zealand Mountain Festival Opening Night on the 28th of June where it has won the Special Jury Award. {{13260}} Angie who has just turned 15 has both Tongan and Spanish heritage and now has her sights set on qualifying for the Olympics.  She shares her 'Story of Ambition' in the video above. JLL Properties  are helping six young climbers (including Angie) to make it onto the world stage. They're providing them with world-class training facilities, a superstar coach and cutting-edge technology to help them analyse their movements like never before - check out the 6 young climbers in the vid below. {{13261}}

  • UNSUNG - THE JETS

    UNSUNG - THE JETS

    Rising to success in the mid-80s, the hit teenage group The Jets put a surprising twist on the Minneapolis sound and drew inspiration from Prince. Comprised of five brothers and three sisters of Tongan descent, the group took the R&B and Pop charts by storm with hits like “Crush on You,” “You Got it All,” and “Make it Real.” With so much of their success based on their youth appeal, the band fizzled from the spotlight by their early 20s. The group’s lead singer left the group after she was diagnosed with breast cancer at 21, and the other siblings gradually drifted apart. Twenty-five years later, the family members are still making music, but have split into two bands due to personal differences. Despite the split, the members are still entertaining audiences with music that initially captured their fans hearts. Watch their journey in the Unsung music documentary above. About Unsung UNSUNG celebrates the lives of trailblazing musicians whose full stories and journey have yet to be explored. This season promises memorable stories of influential artists including singer/songwriter Shirley Murdock, dance music legend Crystal Waters, R&B crooner Glenn Jones, vocalist Kenny Lattimore and contemporary gospel musician Tasha Cobbs Leonard.

  • OCEANS APART - RUPENI CAUCAUNIBUCA

    OCEANS APART - RUPENI CAUCAUNIBUCA

    One of Rugby’s most entertaining players, Rupeni Caucaunibuca was raised in Nasau Village, Bua District of Vanua Levu Island-Fiji, one of the worlds most remote and isolated villages in Fiji. Widely regarded as one of the most naturally gifted players to ever play the game, the man affectionately known as Caucau had an at times puzzling career. He shot onto the scene with the Auckland Blues in Super Rugby before tearing things up with Fiji at the Rugby World Cup, but his career was littered with misdemeanours and inconsistencies. Spells in France with Agen & then Toulouse showed glimpses of what he could do, but weight and other issues seemed to hold him back at times. With no education, and no support mechanisms to help Pacific Islanders, Rupeni was ill-equipped to deal with his meteoric rise to stardom. Now retired, Rupeni currently lives in his village with little means of income. . To help him realise his dream of starting a village business that will support him and his family, Pacific Rugby Players Welfare and Rupeni will be working with The Earth Care Agency, a local Fijian company who specialise in setting up organic, sustainable community businesses. You can help him with this by donating to his crowdfunding page here https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rupenicaucau

  • SEVEN WEEKS - JOURNEY TO POLYFEST

    SEVEN WEEKS - JOURNEY TO POLYFEST

    In 2018, Radio New Zealand followed the St Paul’s College Samoan group as they sacrificed two months of their lives to compete for Polyfest glory. SEVEN WEEKS: Journey to Polyfest is a documentary about family, pride, community and culture, hard work and an honouring of history. Narrated by David Dallas 

  • THE DOME - A Leaking Toxic Timebomb

    THE DOME - A Leaking Toxic Timebomb

    Thousands of cubic metres of radioactive waste lies buried under a concrete dome on the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, the legacy of over a decade of US nuclear tests in the Pacific.  Now rising sea levels are threatening to spill its contents into the sea.

  • PACIFIC LEGENDS OF THE FIELD - Rugby & Rugby League

    PACIFIC LEGENDS OF THE FIELD - Rugby & Rugby League

    We take a look at some of the Pacific legends of the field and the extra challenges that Pacific rugby and league players have to face. What happens when the game NZ idolises most, comes to an end?

  • Gangsters in Paradise - The Deportees of Tonga

    Gangsters in Paradise - The Deportees of Tonga

    In Gangsters in Paradise - Deportees of Tonga, VICE embeds with four Tongan nationals who have been sent back to the tiny island nation where they were born after serving prison time in New Zealand and the United States. Former gang members, they often struggle to reconnect with the culture, the language, and the people. They are haunted by the stigma of their criminal pasts, which casts a pall over their employment prospects and puts a barrier between them and their compatriots. Government support for returnees is non-existent, wages are low, and with Tonga in the midst of a methamphetamine crisis, the temptations to revert to the lives of crime they hoped to leave behind when they left prison are high.

  • IT TAKES A VILLAGE

    IT TAKES A VILLAGE

    Hawaiʻi's high cost of living and unaffordable housing market is putting more and more pressure on local families. How many more people and generations can we squeeze into our homes just to be able to afford to live here? How many more of our family members have to move away before we say enough is enough? The long-term solution is that we need to push for better policies to create enough TRULY affordable housing (below 100% AMI). Unfortunately we have a homeless crisis to deal with right now and new housing programs for the homeless, like Housing First, are working well but are very limited in scale. We, as a society, are unable to provide solutions to this housing and homeless crisis right now so what do we do for our most vulnerable people who are living unsheltered every day that this problem continues?

  • 1918: SAMOA & THE TALUNE - SHIP OF DEATH

    1918: SAMOA & THE TALUNE - SHIP OF DEATH

    The relationship between New Zealand and Samoa is very complex. The pages of our histories are intertwined and blotted with black marks right next to NZ's name. On the 7th November 1918, the NZ military administration controlling Samoa, led by Col. Robert Logan, made the deadly decision to knowingly allow a ship called 'The Talune" carrying Spanish Influenza to dock in Apia Harbour.  The results were catastrophic, wiping out over a quarter of Samoas population and decimating entire families and villages in what is one of the worst cultural catastrophes in history.

  • BORN OF CONFLICT - Children of the Pacific War

    BORN OF CONFLICT - Children of the Pacific War

    Between 1942 and 1945, more than 2 million Americans went to war in the South Pacific. When World War II ended they went home leaving 100,000 dead, tons of military equipment and over 2,000 children.   This doco looks at the stories of three children left behind by American servicemen posted to the Pacific during WWII. Now in their early 70s, these children were identified through an Otago University research programme.

  • Samoa - Diabetes Epidemic

    Samoa - Diabetes Epidemic

    Type 2 Diabetes is now the leading cause of death in Samoa. It threatens to overwhelm the health system and bankrupt the country. What is Samoa doing to turn this around? Like many countries around the world, as Samoa takes on a Western lifestyle they take on Western problems. Type 2 diabetes has gone from non-existent to their biggest killer in a generation.

  • Struggling for a better Living, Squatters in Fiji

    Struggling for a better Living, Squatters in Fiji

    The Pacific Way team travel around the Country looking at squatters and poverty in Fiji. This story seeks to demystify the reason why there are so many squatters in Fiji today and analyses government efforts to reduce their numbers.

  • Chinese businesses in Samoa

    Chinese businesses in Samoa

    This documentary meets the descendants of the people that changed the face of Samoa and takes a look at the potential problems that come with the new wave of Chinese arriving in Samoa today. Despite the history, the newest wave of Chinese to arrive in Samoa has upset a lot of the locals. Taking businesses that should be set aside for Locals, skirting laws set up to prevent them from doing so and funnelling money out of the Samoan economy, are just some of the issues being voiced by Samoans.

  • History of The Chinese in Samoa

    History of The Chinese in Samoa

    The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Samoa in the late 19th Century. As time stretched on and the more that came (be it as free settlers or indentured labourers), they integrated into the culture, learnt the fa'asamoa, married Samoans, had Samoan families and eventually died in Samoa as Samoans. The legacy they left behind is powerful and can be seen in the culture and the people of Samoa today.

  • SAMOANA - Documentary

    SAMOANA - Documentary

    The hour-long documentary covers 3000 years of Samoa’s history. Major events highlighted in the film include the partition of Western Samoa in the nineteenth century, rule by Imperial Germany, New Zealand trusteeship and the road toward independence. Scenes in Samoana include dramatic representation of the killing of unarmed Mau supporters by New Zealand troops in 1929 , and the massive death toll of the influenza epidemic which followed the First World War. The film also illustrates key aspects of “Fa`a Samoa” - tattooing, ava (kava) ceremonies and the chiefly system.

  • Teaching the Taualuga with Filoi Vaila'au

    Teaching the Taualuga with Filoi Vaila'au

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "I wanted to start teaching Siva Samoa because I knew that, that was probably something that was lacking here in New Zealand - not everyone grows up around it" - Filoi Vaila'au 

  • Art & Kava in Urban Tonga

    Art & Kava in Urban Tonga

    This short documentary features the Seleka International Art Society Initiative (SIASI). Seleka is a group of mostly urban youth in the Kingdom of Tonga's capital of Nuku'alofa who gather often, as many Tongans do, in order to ingest the land by drinking kava. They have a twist to their gatherings however with the addition of paint and a broad range of global popular music, including the less commonly heard sounds in a kava session of metal, punk, and more. Their adaptations and reflection of their contemporary identities hasn't gone without scrutiny or controversy, but despite those challenges they remain a safe and creative space for young men and women to explore and confront the taboo's of their society and culture. This footage was being saved to be part of a larger kava documentary project based in my doctoral studies, which is still another year or so away from being completed. Due to the recent devastation of Cyclone Gita last month, Seleka's fale (Tongan house) was destroyed and they have nowhere to gather. Considering the immediate needs for the group, this footage is being released now in hopes to support overseas fundraising efforts and local support to rebuild a meeting place for the Selekarian's. Mālō 'Aupito to Seleka, supporters, and to 'Inoke Hafoka for crucial feedback in the editing process of this film. Fundraising link:  https://www.youcaring.com/selekasiasitonga-1135454

  • Dancing the Taualuga with Ida & Jill

    Dancing the Taualuga with Ida & Jill

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "Taualuga is the dance of life, siva o le ola, with all your heart, ono mea, gracefulness & loto fiafia - happy heart!"

  • Samoan Queen Salamasina

    Samoan Queen Salamasina

    Descendant from a Nafanua line, Salamasina in the 15th Century was the holder of all four Tafa'ifa titles...

  • Samoan Goddess Nafanua

    Samoan Goddess Nafanua

    One of Samoa's most revered Gods of all was female - Nafanua. Born of a blood clot and buried in the ground, this ancient deity rose from the underworld..

  • Makea Takau Ariki

    Makea Takau Ariki

    In Rarotonga in the 1880’s, women had taken on most of the powerful ariki titles, and one of the most powerful Ariki was - Makea Takau Ariki (1839–1911) stay tuned to learn more about this phenomenal woman.

  • History of the Taualuga

    History of the Taualuga

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "The taualuga is the final touch to all the fiafia, the taualuga is the same word that they give to the top part of the fale.  You know when it's there that means the whole thing is finished" - Va'asiliifiti Moelagi Jackson 

  • Graduation Leis - Bringing a piece of home to Anchorage

    Graduation Leis - Bringing a piece of home to Anchorage

    Anchorage is home to thriving Polynesian communities, and over the years residents of the city have adopted a favorite island tradition: honoring graduates with handmade leis. Read the full article on Alaska Dispatch here

  • THE NEW OCEANIA

    THE NEW OCEANIA

    Shirley Horrocks' documentary profiles the life, work and influence of pioneering PI writer Albert Wendt (1973's Sons for the Return Home was the first novel published in English by a Samoan). The film accompanies the writer to various locations in the Pacific and addresses his Samoa upbringing, his education in New Zealand and his work as writer and teacher; and discusses the contemporary explosion of Pacific arts. "I belong to Oceania — or, at least, I am rooted in a fertile part of it and it nourishes my spirit, helps to define me, and feeds my imagination." 

  • The Tongan Tau'olunga with Sesilia Pusiaki

    The Tongan Tau'olunga with Sesilia Pusiaki

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "For me it's always an experience ... every time I perform it, it's a different feeling and it's a different moment.  I'm dancing dances that were done by my grandmother and my auntys from back then" - Sesilia Pusiaki 

  • Tau'olunga with Amanaki Prescott Faletau

    Tau'olunga with Amanaki Prescott Faletau

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "Taualuga & Tau'olunga gave me the tools to be graceful and soft & just to learn to be still and be beautiful in stillness" - Amanaki Prescott Faletau 

  • Taualuga with Maryjane

    Taualuga with Maryjane

    One of most treasured heritage art forms in the Pacific is our dance – and expression of our social roles, status, our joy for life and our soul. In Samoa and Tonga one of the most revered dances is the Taualuga – the dance of life. "With the taualuga, it's just the best way for me to express myself as a Samoan, it was like when I put my hands up it felt like all the energy from our ancestors, I wasn't just dancing for myself" - Maryjane Mckibbin Schwenke 

  • Christmas Day on Mauke in the Cook Islands

    Christmas Day on Mauke in the Cook Islands

    The people of Mauke have a holiday tradition that is different than any of the other islands in the Cooks. Every Christmas and New Years one of the two villages on the island hosts the other with a feast. The food is laid out at different houses throughout the host village. The guest village then goes from house to house singing traditional songs. Christmas Day starts with a church service and then everyone starts making the rounds singing and feasting. This starts around 1:00 PM and goes on until well after dark. Then, on New Years Day, the villages switch roles and the ones that sang host the other village and they do the singing.

  • BOO YAA T.R.I.B.E Documentary

    BOO YAA T.R.I.B.E Documentary

    A short documentary on the Boo Yaa T.R.I.B.E - Samoan brothers who grew up in Carson, California and are celebrated as the pioneers of Samoan & Poly Hip Hop. They've collaborated with many hip hop & rock artists including Eminem, Mack 10 & The Transplants. Behind the scenes with Boo Yaa T.R.I.B.E on the set of 'Another Body Murdered' with Faith No More and an interview with Ted Devoux aka 'The godfather'. {{8918}} Check out this video of them when they first started out as a dance group the 'Blue City Strutters' where they're featured in the 'Breakin n Enterin, West Coast Hip Hop Doc' 

  • Pacific Island Dance & Hair

    Pacific Island Dance & Hair

    Hair is a vital part of Pacific Island dance and performance. Check out how the various islands deal with all that beautiful hair! To learn about the history of womens hair in the pacific, click here For more hair stories, click here

  • The History of Pacific Hair

    The History of Pacific Hair

    We take you back in time through the Pacific Islands to see the various cultural and traditional hair practices among women. For more on Pacific hair, watch our documentary Adorn For hair stories click here

  • Don't Touch My Hair Stories

    Don't Touch My Hair Stories

    For Island women, we know the struggles and joys that come with our hair. Here are a few stories from our Pasifika sisters on all things HAIR! The third and final segment from Coconet Documentary "Adorn"  ADORN is a collection of stories from women around the Pacific about their relationship with their hair. 

  • Some More Samoa - Tuiga

    Some More Samoa - Tuiga

    This SILENT film clip shows a young Samoan woman having help to assemble and put on a tuiga (ceremonial headdress). In the past tuiga were worn by chiefs during war, overtime these became a status symbol worn during various ceremonies by a chief’s manaia (son) or taupou (daughter). This clip shows how complicated traditional tuiga are, contemporary versions are simplified and assembled in one piece from various urban materials and can be worn by anyone as an expression of Samoan heritage. (Nitrate film deterioration is evident at the end of this clip.) Katharine Hilliker (1885-1965) was the title writer for this silent film. For more information on Katharine Hilliker see Women's Pioneers Film Project https://wfpp.cdrs.columbia.edu/pionee....

  • HOMELESS IN HAWAI'I

    HOMELESS IN HAWAI'I

    Hawai'i has the highest rate of homelesness per capita in the USA exposing an ugly social divide in the Aloha State. It is estimated that there are 7,000 - 8,000 Homeless people in Hawaii, a majory of which live in Oahu. In 2015, Hawaii's state of Govenor David Ige declared a state on Emergency homelessness. This documentary delves into the deep social divide in the beautiful island onf Hawaii. A confronting, moving piece.

  • DRAGONS IN PARADISE

    DRAGONS IN PARADISE

    The first wave of Chinese immigrants arrived in Samoa in the late 19th Century. As time stretched on and the more that came (be it as free settlers or indentured labourers), they integrated into the culture, learnt the fa'asamoa, married Samoans, had Samoan families and eventually died in Samoa as Samoans. The legacy they left behind is powerful and can be seen in the culture and the people of Samoa today. Despite the history, the newest wave of Chinese to arrive in Samoa has upset a lot of the locals. Taking businesses that should be set aside for Locals, skirting laws set up to prevent them from doing so and funnelling money out of the Samoan economy, are just some of the issues being voiced by Samoans. This documentary delves in to the past, meets the descendants of the people that changed the face of Samoa and takes a look at the potential problems that come with the new wave of Chinese arriving in Samoa today. This is Dragons In Paradise.

  • FA'AFAFINE - Documentary

    FA'AFAFINE - Documentary

    The stories of Samoan fa'afafine from the farms of Savai'i to the stages of the world. Stories that explore the evolution of what it means to be fa'afafine & societies views towards them.

  • COOK ISLANDS TRADITIONAL FOOD FOR SURVIVAL

    COOK ISLANDS TRADITIONAL FOOD FOR SURVIVAL

    Mama Teura Tuakanangaro from the island of Mauke, shares many of the traditional foods & recipes that they would make in the Cook Islands in preparation to survive Cyclone Season. These foods were also prepared by our Pacific Island ancestors when they would go on long ocean voyages.

  • EVERYTHING CAN BE BURNT - West Papua in the Jokowi Era

    EVERYTHING CAN BE BURNT - West Papua in the Jokowi Era

    The face of West Papuan society is changing but RNZ International found that the core ideology of the indigenous people of Indonesia's Papua region is not easily destroyed. Since the making of this documentary, a petition signed by 1.8 million West Papuans seeking an independent vote and self determination was rejected by the United Nations. The United Liberation Movement for West Papua now hopes New Zealand's new Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern will take up the issue of their Self Determination with many of her Pacific leaders in the Labour government very supportive of West Papua's human rights.  

  • FIJI INDEPENDENCE

    FIJI INDEPENDENCE

    Fiji became an independent sovereign state on 10th October 1970 when its colonial status was abrogated. Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara, the first Prime Minister of independent Fiji, received from Prince Charles the documents evidencing Fiji’s independence. That independence was and remains a great source of pride and joy to all Fiji citizens. On that day the dark clouds of colonialism were swept away. This 5 part documentary looks at the road to Fiji's independence. . Part 2 {{5666}} Part 3 {{5667}} Part 4 {{5668}} Part 5 {{5669}}